Doña Ana County

DOÑA ANA COUNTY DEBUTS OPERATION COMMUNITY SWEEP

DOÑA ANA COUNTY DEBUTS OPERATION COMMUNITY SWEEP

     Doña Ana County recently launched Operation Community Sweep, an intensive clean-up effort to enforce county environmental, animal control and building codes ordinances, one community at a time.
     Starting in Chaparral this month, Operation Community Sweep already collected and properly disposed of 17 tons of trash.  Keeping the cleanup momentum, codes enforcement officers have integrated efforts to remove graffiti, inoperable vehicles, tire accumulation, uncovered containers or accumulated trash, and weeds. The goal for the program includes bringing all animal owners into compliance with rabies vaccinations, microchips and animal permits.  Operation Community Sweep will also target mobile home owners who need to comply with permit requirements.
     “Operation Community Sweep addresses specific areas of the county to bring about a quicker, more significant impact upon that community,” said Mary Lou Ward, Doña Ana County Animal Control and Codes Enforcement Supervisor. “And because we are working in partnership with the residents of that community, we are confident this operation will have lasting effects.”
     The initiative was launched in response to feedback from residents and a need identified by the Doña Ana County Animal Control and Codes Enforcement Department and the Building Services Division, for an integrated, more concerted clean-up approach.
     Throughout the year, officers help residents across the county come into compliance by providing educational information and facilitating community cleanups and animal services programs like the Animal Control Environmental Survey, or ACES, projects. Staff from Doña Ana County’s Animal Control & Codes and Community Development Departments are currently visiting a variety of Chaparral areas to identify violations and provide that support. 
     The county also aims to clear out an estimated 400 dilapidated mobile homes in and around Chaparral. Uninhabitable, abandoned mobile homes that are falling apart, especially when trash collects around them can become dangerous or a menace to public health and require removal.  Along with inoperable vehicles, owners can safely dispose of unwanted, inoperable mobile homes and vehicles by following South Central Solid Waste regulations at each transfer station or the landfill. Solid waste loaded onto a flatbed should be covered and secured to prevent debris from obstructing or damaging roads, on the way to the transfer station.
     Tires on vehicles and a couple of spares for repairs are a necessity, but more than a 10-tire pile is considered commercial use and that type of accumulation can create hazards for both animals and humans.  For that reason, Chaparral residents are encouraged to discard unwanted tires. A Tire Amnesty Day will be announced soon for Chaparral residents to dispose of their tires properly, safely and free of charge.
     “These integrated efforts will continue throughout the winter months and demonstrate how Doña Ana County can jump into action when constituents engage and voice their concerns,” Ward said.  “In line with the county’s mission, we aim to help improve all residents’ quality of life and hope to welcome the spring with a renewed sense of community in Chaparral, enjoying clean roads, yards and public spaces.”
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